What You Can Learn From Investors in Pakistan

The Wall Street bullies want to convince you that you need to continue trading in order to successfully invest. There is nothing further from the truth. Remember your portfolio is like a bar of soap, the more you touch it the smaller it gets. Successful investors build a globally diversifed portfolio and rebalane. Trying to stock pick or time the market will only lead to very disappointing results. You need a coach to protect your future self from your current self.

CNBC Pakistan HQ in Karachi, Sindh
CNBC Pakistan HQ in Karachi, Sindh (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The economy of Pakistan is equally troubled. According to the Heritage Foundation, its economy has been plagued by “political instability and violence.” Much needed economic reform has been stalled by bureaucratic delays and lack of political will. Property rights in Pakistan are “compromised.” The rule of law is “fragile.” Taxation is “poorly administered.” Its public debt is over 50 percent of total domestic output. Foreign investment is declining. Its overall ranking on economic freedom is below the world and even regional averages, placing it in the category of “mostly unfree” economies. To put this in perspective, there is more economic freedom in Yemen, Senegal and Nigeria than in Pakistan. Its unemployment rate is a staggering 15 percent. Its inflation rate is 11.7 percent.Does this country seem like a good place to invest to you?

Now for the shocker: Year-to-date returns for the stock market of Pakistan were 46.73 percent. That’s not a typo. Year-to-date returns for the U.S. during the same period were 11.90 percent.

Here are some other interesting facts. The stock markets in Nigeria and Kenya
were 27.26 percent and 26.56 percent, respectively. What about the returns in fast-growing economies like Brazil and China? Brazil was an anemic 1.43 percent. China was a loss of 10.20 percent.

If you are a typical investor, you believe paying attention to the financial news is important to your investing success. You read the financial media. You watch CNBC and pay special attention to the fund managers who “explain” the stock markets to you and encourage you to follow their advice (often by investing with their firms). Maybe you follow the stock picks served up by Jim Cramer, who appears to have an encyclopedic knowledge of all things financial.

Let me ask you this question. Did any source of financial news advise you to invest in the stock markets of Pakistan, Nigeria or Kenya? Or Turkey, which topped the list with returns of 47.31 percent? How about your broker or financial adviser? They make it appear they have special insight into the financial markets. Did they advise you to invest in any of the countries reporting returns higher than the U.S.?

The average returns of the 77 countries is a positive return of 8.47 percent. In 2011, the average was a negative 14.15 percent and the list of top performers was markedly different, with Venezuela, Jamaica and Botswana turning in stellar results, along with Pakistan which came in second.

Trying to predict which country will perform best in 2013 is a crapshoot. So is trying to pick stocks that are mispriced, or betting on which asset class will outperform. Yet the securities industry continues to thrive by persuading you to pay its members fat fees for dispensing precisely this kind of “advice.”

The next time your broker peers into his crystal ball and makes a recommendation, ask this question: Did you predict stellar returns in Pakistan, Nigeria or Kenya for 2012?

This bears repeating NO ONE can predict the future. The ‘talking heads’ on television have one goal. to sell more advertising. If you take investment advice from these heads you will lose.

Please comment or call to discuss how this affects you and your financial future.

Posted via email from Curated 401k Plan Content

  • Pakistan, 10 others to surpass EU by 2030: US govt report
  • Market Trends
Enhanced by Zemanta

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.